The Madames kick off the “Studio Session” interview series with a very special guest. Agents of SHIELD fans know and love him as sentient Chronicom & best friend of Leopold Fitz, Enoch Coltrane. Have a listen to our chat with long-time actor and designer Joel Stoffer!

Joel Stoffer
Joel Stoffer

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For more discussion of Joel’s work on Agents of SHIELD, check out our full commentary series.

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Here’s the full transcript of the interview:

Madame Amy:
I don’t think I’ve seen so much heartbreak over when Enoch was left behind.

Joel Stoffer:
That was a lot of fun. I was very tired after doing that run, I don’t know, maybe at least six or eight times.

Madame Kris:
Oh, wow.

Joel Stoffer:
Full sprint.

Madame Amy:
Wow.

Joel Stoffer:
But it was fun and it was great. And again, it was another thing where they just left the camera going, and after I got to my mark, where I had to stop, nobody yelled cut. So I just kept kind of rolling with it and I think it was good. It worked out.

Madame Kris:
Welcome to the first installment of our interview series here at the Marvelous Madames Podcast “Studio Sessions with the Madames.”

Madame Amy:
Our guest today has appeared in a long list of films and TV shows over the last 25 years. He’s also received critical acclaim for his stage work and production design.

Madame Kris:
But our Agents of SHIELD fans will know him best as sentient Chronicom and best friend of Leopold Fitz. Enoch Coltrane. Welcome to the show and thank you so much for being here, Mr. Joel Stoffer.

Joel Stoffer:
Thank you very much. Very glad to be here.

Madame Kris:
So how’s life been treating you in these interesting times?

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, treating me pretty well, me and my family. I’m grateful every day that considering what we’re all going through, that we’re still around and healthy.

Madame Kris:
So you were in your early twenties when you landed your first network TV gig on a CBS show. Diagnosis: Murder, yes?

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. Gosh, that is true.

Madame Kris:
I was born 60 years old, so I was a fan of that show. That’s, that’s pretty young to land a role. When did you decide you wanted to be an actor?

Joel Stoffer:
That came in high school actually. I had done theater in high school and knew that it was something that I was passionate about from a pretty early age. It was acting and, actually, architecture were two things that I really loved. And I went and applied to some schools and the two that I got into had were more heavily weighted towards theater arts. And so that’s the direction I went in and I kind of passed up on getting an architecture degree. But I would come around. I would come back to that later. I still didn’t have an architecture degree, but I did end up pursuing architecture. And that’s something that I still do, that I’m doing currently actually.

Madame Amy:
Oh, that’s actually quite interesting. Would you say that influenced you in your set design work?

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, definitely. Definitely. Yeah, just having a sense of theater and how images just physically can affect people’s emotions when they’re watching something in the theater and how to create a space for actors to move around and to convey whatever you know is not being said in the text.

Madame Amy:
Right.

Joel Stoffer:
And so having a way to visualize that I think was something that always fascinated me and challenged me.

Madame Amy:
Ok, do you think that the set design can influence you as an actor?

Joel Stoffer:
Absolutely. It does in theater and it certainly does in film. The difference between playing a scene with no set and playing the scene with a set is night and day. When you have a whole crew putting together a set and your wardrobe and everything, and then you, as the actor, come in with your lines memorized and you’re really just walking into that world, makes your ability to believe the circumstances that much easier. I mean it’s everything, definitely.

Madame Kris:
So what kind of training did you pursue then? In terms of both acting and design.

Joel Stoffer:
It was a theater degree that I got from Bard College in New York city. And for architecture, mostly it was hands-on experience. I did take architecture classes. So I studied just kind of the basics of architecture just to have an understanding of what it means to put together a set of construction drawings and that kind of thing. And then I had been a finished carpenter, because acting is that kind of job, unless you’re really lucky to just be somebody who works constantly, it’s just that kind of job that comes only once in a while. And I’ve been lucky enough to have some steady work with acting, which has been great, but there have been times where I haven’t. And so you gotta pay the bills. And I’ve been a finished carpenter. I do, and I’ve been building built-ins and kitchens, bookcases, things like that for like 25, almost 30 years. And so that combined with my desire and my interest in designing eventually led me to wanting to move on from the physical labor of doing more. It’s very rewarding. You know, I really actually enjoyed it, but it really took a toll on my body.

Madame Amy:
Yeah sure, of course.

Joel Stoffer:
And so I kind of have started to focus more on the design in the last five or 10 years. So that’s what I’m doing right now. Oh, man. It just is really mostly self-taught. It’s just about being on the job

Madame Kris:
So you’ve received critical acclaim for this design. You actually won an Ovation Award for Best Set Design for “Coyote on a Fence” in L.A. A while back.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. You did some research. That’s great.

Madame Kris:
We are nothing if not thorough.

Joel Stoffer:
That’s great.

Madame Kris:
So I’m curious, which did you prefer New York or L.A.?

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, well, no, I haven’t really done any work in New York. I was only there for college.

Madame Kris:
Okay.

Joel Stoffer:
Because I’m from L.A. And I toyed with the idea of staying in New York when I graduated, but I had a lot of contacts here in LA and I knew I needed to try to make those happen and pursue those. So came back to LA and I’ve been here ever since.

Madame Amy:
Oh, okay. That’s great.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah.

Madame Kris:
How was your time with the Alliance Repertory Company?

Joel Stoffer:
It was great. That’s where I did my theater work for 15 years mostly there. I did some other shows outside of the Alliance during that time, but that was home for sure. And it was an opportunity to just get really involved in the process of what it means to run a theater and produce theater and design sets and build them and be an actor and director. And all aspects of the theater I got to explore, which was really great.

Madame Amy:
So your work in the theater and really getting involved, would you say that influenced you as an actor and in all the roles that you’ve done so far?

Joel Stoffer:
Well, yeah, I would say every role that I’ve done adds to every role that comes after. And in some, I think that, I assume that’s true for every actor. I don’t know that I consciously took anything from those roles or that experience, but it’s just all wrapped up in me and it’s got to come out somehow.

Madame Kris:
It builds on itself.

Joel Stoffer:
Exactly. Exactly.

Madame Kris:
So with all these connections that you’ve built up along the way, is that how you landed the role of Enoch or did you audition? Can you tell us about that whole process?

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. That’s, that’s actually a really cool story. So it is about connection so much in this town, in the acting world. I lived in an apartment in North Hollywood about 25 years ago now. God. Yeah, it’s been about that is when I first moved in and for like, about a year or two that I was living in this apartment, I had a neighbor who had a housemate who was this woman named Hannah Cooper. And she was like 20 at the time. And I didn’t really know her, but we were friends and we would say”Hi” to each other once in a while and chat for a while. And then literally like 20 years later, she knew that I was an actor, but you know, I guess had not been in a position to do anything, but 20 years later she called me in. She was working in Sarah Finn’s office, casting Agents of SHIELD. And she called me in and I auditioned for a couple of roles on that show in seasons three and four, I want to say.

Madame Amy:
Okay.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. And I didn’t get them. And then I got a call from my manager at some point towards the end of season four. And she said that they had offered me a role. And originally it was just the silhouetted man.

Madame Amy:
Yes. I was hoping to actually ask you, because generally I have no idea about the industry at all, but I have noticed like at the end of a season, when they want to introduce a new character, sometimes the voice doesn’t match. But in your case it did match to when you did come in as Enoch.

Joel Stoffer:
Right.

Joel Stoffer:
So this was supposed to just be the silhouetted man. And that’s it?

Joel Stoffer:
Well, no. They had said that if they get picked up for a fifth season, that there was a chance I would come back for maybe one or two episodes.

Madame Amy:
Wow.

Joel Stoffer:
And yeah. So I was, of course, very excited when they got picked up and I thought, ‘Oh, I’m going to do a couple more episodes. How cool.’ And it just kind of snowballed from there. It clicked for everybody, you know? And that’s just one of those amazing things that can happen sometimes. In this business, I’m still blown away by it. It just kept going.

Madame Kris:
What was your relationship to the show before you audition for anything? Was it on your radar? Were you a fan?

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, I mean I was a fan of the show. I’d only seen a couple of episodes. And then when I booked the role, I was like, I better catch up on this. And so I started watching and once I got into it, I was hooked. I kept like putting other things off so I could binge watch to get caught up. And so I became a fan of the show for sure.

Madame Kris:
Yeah. It’s like a book you can’t put down.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. But, just to get back to that, the importance of having connections, never burning a bridge because you never know when it’s going to come back around. And so for Hannah to have like reached out 20 years later…

Madame Amy:
That’s incredible.

Joel Stoffer:
It’s pretty cool. And, you know, throw my name into the mix for this role that they were going to offer to somebody. I was one of several people that had their video reels sent to the producers and for whatever reason, they chose me off of my reel.

Madame Amy:
We could just say that we’re super happy that they chose you.

Madame Kris:
Yeah, they went the right way.

Joel Stoffer:
I think so. Like they knew what they were doing.

Madame Amy:
Oh, absolutely. Yes.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah.

Madame Kris:
So what was it like joining such an established ensemble cast this late in a series run?

Joel Stoffer:
It was phenomenal. Everybody welcomed me with open arms and nobody even really knew even then, I don’t even think the writers and the producers knew exactly how much they were going to use me. So I don’t think they had to be nice to me. They were all just really, really great. And we’ve become friends over the last few years and that’s just a credit to the people at the top. I mean Jed and Marissa and Jeff Bell. And all those guys were so inclusive and they made it part of their goal to make anybody on that show part of the family. Even if it was just a one day guest star, they were really, really warm and welcoming. And I think as long as they continue to get that back from whoever they added to the show, they would keep putting it out there. If somebody was not a good fit for them and didn’t really have the right attitude, then they could be gone. And I know I had heard that that had happened, but that’s understandable. That wasn’t coming from them. That was just what the actor makes of their situation.

Madame Amy:
Yeah. And I think that having a good rapport with people you work with is super important and it’s completely understandable. It makes a big difference in the team.

Madame Kris:
And that shows through in every episode too. It really does.

Joel Stoffer:
I think. So it really helps the overall vibe of the show.

Madame Amy:
Yeah. What was your biggest challenge that you faced while you were playing Enoch?

Joel Stoffer:
I think it was just trying to find the line between how much robot and how much human to bring to the role. The thing is, at first I didn’t even know, certainly in episode 4×22. I had no idea what I was and they wouldn’t tell me anything. I don’t even think they knew they had a sense of where they might go into season five. But at that point in season four, I think they needed somebody that was sort of the catalyst to get them onto that next plot. But I don’t know that they knew that I was going to be this Chronicom alien. And that kind of came about in the hiatus after season four was finished and they started really writing those episodes. And so it wasn’t until episode 5×01 that I learned. My character name on the first episode on the script was actually Silas, believe it or not.

Madame Amy:
Oh!

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. And then before the episode aired, they changed it to Enoch, which I think is a much better name.

Madame Kris:
Yes.

Joel Stoffer:
That’s a little bit of information, but again, there was so little that they could tell me and I was just making it up as I went along. And I think that what we all kind of realized was that, yes, he’s an alien and he’s an Android. But I don’t want to play him as a total robot. There has to be some element of humanity to him or vulnerability to him.

Madame Kris:
Right.

Joel Stoffer:
But still, you can’t go too far in that direction either. So finding that balance was the key. That was the biggest struggle.

Madame Kris:
You do a brilliant job of walking that line. And in fact, like there are times when I find Enoch very reminiscent of Mr. Spock in that regard.

Joel Stoffer:
Yes. Yeah, absolutely. I’ve never consciously drawn from Spock or from the actor who played Data.

Madame Kris:
Oh, Brent Spiner.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah, Brent Spiner. Another great example of that kind of character. But I know that I would not have had the character that I brought without those guys. There’s just no way, because I watched them so much when I was younger and I am definitely pulling from what they did.

Madame Kris:
Right.

Madame Amy:
So did you revisit them now that you knew at this point before 5×01, that you are playing this Android character? Did you revisit any of these old favorites? What kind of preparation did you do?

Joel Stoffer:
I didn’t really. I didn’t look into that at all. I just kind of winged it. In all honestly, I think I just took what I could off the page that I was reading and the scene and found something in my voice that seemed to click. So what it was for me is, and I kind of said this the other day in an interview too, whenever I would have an emotional reaction to a situation, instead of having the emotional reaction be an emotional reaction, I would turn it into curiosity and into intrigue, so that that was it. I wouldn’t let it go past just curiosity and intrigued again. And I really got that from the script because the character’s described as a sentient Chronicom and an anthropologist. He’s basically a scientist. And so I just kind of left it at that and let that kind of feed my responses to any given situation.

Madame Kris:
Oh, I’m really glad you brought that up because Enoch’s voice is such an important aspect of the character. And we can say now that you sound different than Enoch does, and what I’m wondering is have you ever considered doing voice work? Because you’re made for it.

Joel Stoffer:
Well, I have done some and I’m actually pursuing that currently even more, but in the last year, I have actually been able to do some voice work and I’m hoping to do more for sure.

Madame Amy:
Something that we could maybe know about right now?

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. There’s a Netflix documentary on Maradona, the soccer player.

Madame Amy:
Oh, okay.

Joel Stoffer:
From Argentina. And it’s all in Spanish. And so they have a lot of interviews with Maradona where he’s talking a lot and they needed somebody to voice him in English. And so they hired me for that, which is good and it’s a totally different voice than Enoch. And so that was fun. And then there was another Netflix job that I did for dubbing, so the work that I’ve done so far has been dubbing over Spanish-speaking actors in English. Butso far, that’s what I’ve done. And I expect that there are going to be more coming.

Madame Kris:
I think so. And I, I think we can speak for all the fan base of Agents of SHIELD, when we say that everyone would love that.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. Thank you.

Madame Kris:
So what aspect of working on the show, did you enjoy the most?

Joel Stoffer:
So much of it. Anytime I got to be performing with the other actors,I think. On the set, that’s where it all lives for me, from the moment the word “Action!” is called and you get to have a scene with somebody. Especially because it’s so fleeting in film and TV, and that is really what we are so primed to do. There’s so much more that happens before and after that moment. So it’s those moments between action and cut that are really where you get to fly and experience that thing that has driven you for all these years,

Madame Kris:
Right.

Joel Stoffer:
And the actors on the show were so, so great and fun – so much laughing and goofing around and having jokes, which is all part of the process really. It’s not just goofing off. It’s how you connect in between the scenes, when you’re working with your fellow actors and it develops. It’s how you develop the rapport so that when you do get to be on shooting the scene, that rapport really can come through, developing when you’re sitting off set and chatting and gabbing and all that.

Madame Amy:
Yeah. It does really shine through.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah.

Madame Kris:
Was season six an extra special treat for you to film as a set designer? Because they have done such an amazing job with the little details and the time travel for this season. It’s been lovely.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. It was great. It was so fun. And being a set designer over the years, watching what they did with taking a sound stage from one plot line to the next, where like it would be one scene, one set, for one plot line and then you’d move away from it. And other things are being shot. They’re completely revamping that same set and transforming it into something that’s unrecognizable in the next plot line, and becomes something completely different. That was really fun to see how they just could transform something like that really quickly. But getting to play on it was even more fun.

Madame Kris:
Right. Can you give us an example? Like, did the Zephyr double as anything else?

Joel Stoffer:
The Zephy Is the Zephyr.

Madame Kris:
Okay.

Joel Stoffer:
The Zephyr is always the Zephyr. It got revamped a few times and then some things changed in it, but it’s always the Zephyr. But like, for instance, in season seven, the bar where I have this scene with Koenig and then… you’ll see. But that bar was the same place where they had the bar on Kitson in season six.

Madame Kris:
Which is one of the best episodes.

Joel Stoffer:
Right. So episode three, and then you see it again in several episodes. But that bar was the planet Kitson brothel/casino and they just moved a few things around and totally transformed it into another bar. And I’m going to say there was another way that we use that and I’m not remembering what it was exactly. There was another. That very set had been another scene as well. I just love that they can take the same space, basically the same walls and just reinvent them that way.

Madame Amy:
Yeah. And have you, as a set designer, been tempted to give your input?

Joel Stoffer:
Oh no, no. I did it for theater and so it’s kind of the same bones, but it’s still a very, very different medium. I did talk to a lot of the set guys on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. I told them that I had done it in the years past. And so we did get to chat and they appreciated that. I knew what their job was about and what they did and how valuable it is. And so we got to have some good conversations, but I would never presume to offer my input. These guys are total pros. They know what they’re doing.

Madame Kris:
So can you tell us, without spoiling anything, what was your favorite scene to film?

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, wow. Well definitely 6×03. The scene of the existential angst that Enoch goes through in season six, that was so much fun because again, it was working with the writer, Craig Titley, on that, and then with Jesse Bochco who was directing it. And they trusted me. They said how do you want to, how do you see playing the scene? What do, you want to do with this? And I was able to just kind of come up with a couple of moments here and there. And I had maybe a suggestion of doing something, and then Jesse was like, eh, maybe we won’t go that way. Partly just because it would have meant a whole new setup with lights and camera, which that was already an incredibly long shoot day as it was. So sometimes decisions are made based on just logistics, but we ended up making it work and having fun. And Jesse was like, you’re making choices that are bringing a lot more to the scene and we’re just going to follow that. And so he would have told me. Sometimes actors will make choices and he has to be like, “no.” And then other times it’s the right way to go. And I think having that kind of collaboration is what makes it a great experience.

Madame Amy:
That’s fantastic. And how much over the years have you been able to give in terms of input to your character?

Joel Stoffer:
As Enoch, or just in general?

Madame Amy:
As Enoch. How much did you influence Enoch?

Joel Stoffer:
I think I would have to say, without like, tooting my own horn too much, it pretty much came from me. They made the right choice in having me play the role, in hiring me to begin with. But I think, once I got to make some choices, I remember thinking, I have no idea what I’m doing here, and I’m just going to have to go into this and trust it and not get in my own way. I’m not going to freak myself out. I’m not going to scare myself away from this. I just have to trust that I’m going to make the choices that are going to work. And they let me do it. And I think what was cool is that at any point they could have said, ‘you know what, this is not really working. We’re just going to have to write this character out of the show and leave it at that.’ And I think they could have done that. And I totally understand that because they’ve got to keep the show interesting and keep it moving. But each episode that came up, it kept inspiring them. What I was doing was inspiring them to keep writing for me. And that’s what was really fun. And so I got to inspire the writers and they helped guide what I came in to do each day because of what they wrote. I got to say their lines. And without those lines, I don’t have a lot of the great moments that Enoch gets to have.

Madame Kris:
Right. And, you know, we’ve talked on our show about the fact that Fitz has been missing the whole season, but it hasn’t detracted from the show in any way. It’s given the rest of the characters a lot more time with their arcs. And Enoch has been a big part of filling that void and just being this breath of fresh air.

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, good. I’m glad to hear that. That’s great.

Madame Kris:
Is there a particularly memorable behind the scenes moment that you can share?

Joel Stoffer:
Boy, there’s so there’s so many of them. I’m trying to think back. It’s been a while. I can’t even come up with anything right now. My mind is like racing through so many different moments.

Madame Amy:
Well, if you’re having trouble choosing you don’t have to just say one.

Joel Stoffer:
Because I keep wanting to go to this one that I can’t talk about yet, because it hasn’t happened yet.

Madame Amy:
Maybe we’ll have you back after the show’s over, then you can talk to us about that.

Madame Amy:
Otherwise the Marvel snipers will be on a rooftop somewhere.

Joel Stoffer:
Exactly, exactly. They’ll take me out.

Madame Amy:
And us out too.

Joel Stoffer:
Disney is very serious about that kind of thing.

Madame Amy:
Yeah. Any funny scenes, anything funny that happened, that you can talk about?

Madame Kris:
Anybody get cake in their face on their birthday?.

Joel Stoffer:
There were lots of birthday celebrations. That was the other thing that worked out on episode 6×03, the existential angst scene. I got to shoot that on my birthday.

Madame Kris:
Oh wow.

Joel Stoffer:
And so we had a little celebration. So that was just an epic day all the way around, but that was a fairly common thing. There was always somebody’s birthday, cast or crew that was being celebrated. It seems everybody was elevated to a high level regardless of what they were doing on the show. That was pretty cool.

Madame Kris:
That’s lovely.

Madame Amy:
And may I just say perfect day to shoot an existential angst sort of scene is on your birthday

Joel Stoffer:
Yes. Yeah I loved it. It was really great.

Madame Amy:
You’ve been very vocal on Twitter about social justice and politics. We feel that Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. has been really good this season with addressing racism and sexism. How do you feel about that?

Joel Stoffer:
I’m really proud of the way that they tried to address it. Obviously it’s a very fine line that they can walk where if they come out too strong in one direction, then it really becomes distracting to what the show is about and there’s only so much they can do. And I think that they take it to a good point in terms of drawing attention to issues politically and socially that people need to be aware of and do need to think about. And I think if it just is enough to plant the seed in the audience’s mind, then they’ve done their job. And I think they handled that really well in terms of dealing with discrimination and political issues, giving women more powerful roles. I think it has been really a pretty bright point for the show.

Madame Amy:
Yes, yes. And Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. has been really great since day one about that.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah.

Madame Kris:
Generally speaking, in terms of the content we all consume, how do you think we can be better allies to people of color?

Joel Stoffer:
I think that it’s time to really start being more vocal about it. And sitting back and just saying ‘I’m not racist’ is not enough. We have to be anti-racist. We have to really come out actively showing support and bringing that awareness to any situation we’re going to. And anytime we see racism, even in subtle ways, I think we have to be vocal about what we see, call it out.

Madame Kris:
Yeah, definitely.

Joel Stoffer:
I think it’s really critical. And clearly voting in people into office that are aware of that and recognize that, that’s such an important thing. I think that’s going to be everything. If we can get our population to vote, I think we’ll be okay. That’s really the biggest obstacle right now as far as I’m concerned.

Madame Kris:
Yeah. Agreed. So now we saved the most important question for last. We and our listeners are dying to know, what exactly is in a barracoolada?

Joel Stoffer:
I wish I knew! I know it was usually kind of lemony, some kind of a citrusy quality to it. But the prop guy that made the drink did not really make it to be good. He made sure that it wasn’t going to be toxic and I don’t know if he even made it the same way every time. It was really so much for show, but I I would have a sip of it and it was fine. It wasn’t like bad tasting, but it was not something that I was like, ‘yeah, gimme another one.’ And I never got the actual list of ingredients, I’m sad to say, other than what you could see, which were eyeballs of some sort. I don’t know if you can tell when you see me drinking, one of them.

Madame Amy:
I’ll be honest. I missed that. I missed that part.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. There’s an eyeball that’s on a toothpick, like a skewer and it’s some kind of an eyeball thing.

Madame Kris:
I definitely thought that was an onion.

Joel Stoffer:
Well, maybe they didn’t want to make it so obviously an eyeball. I think maybe it’s kind of subtle, but that was the idea.

Madame Amy:
And seeing an eyeball in your drink would certainly make you not want another one, no matter how good it is.

Joel Stoffer:
Exactly.

Madame Amy:
So you have a little upcoming project. Can you tell us just a little bit about that?

Joel Stoffer:
Only that it is an episode, and they haven’t said anything more to me than that on Stranger Things season four.

Madame Amy:
Wow.

Joel Stoffer:
They cast me during the quarantine. It was like right after the quarantine started and they have been on hiatus, obviously. And I know that Georgia has kind of semi-restarted production in a very limited capacity. I have not heard anything about when Stranger Things is going to be back. So I expect to hear in the next couple of weeks and get my dates for when I’m supposed to go there.

Madame Amy:
Okay.

Madame Kris:
All right. And that’s so fitting because there have been a number of times watching Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. where I’ve thought, ‘Oh, this theme music right now reminds me of Stranger Things.’

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, right, right. Yes. It does have that eighties vibe to it sometimes.

Madame Amy:
Well, now our listeners are going to be extra excited for Stranger Things because there’s definitely overlap between the fans of Marvel and fans of Stranger Things. For sure.

Joel Stoffer:
Yeah. The only thing I’ll say is it’s a very different character than Enoch. That’s all I can say.

Madame Amy:
Hopefully we don’t have you just for one or two episodes and we get to see more of you.

Joel Stoffer:
Oh, that would be great.

Madame Kris:
So as we finish up here, can you tell our listeners where they can find you online?

Joel Stoffer:
They can find me on Twitter and Instagram. Those are some of the places.

Madame Kris:
So your Twitter handle is @obleyo How do you pronounce that?

Joel Stoffer:
It’s oh-blee-oh and it’s a nickname that my uncle gave me when I was a kid in the seventies. There was an animated film back, I think it was ’71 or ’72, and it’s called The Point. And there is a little boy in this animated movie named Obleyo. And so at the time it was kind of like a very popular thing. And my uncle decided to call me Obleyo and it kind of stuck within my family.

Madame Kris:
I knew there had to be a story there.

Joel Stoffer:
It’s pretty obscure. But yes, it’s @Obleyo, but if you just go on Twitter and you type in Joel Stoffer it’ll come up.

Madame Amy:
Yeah. Thank you so much. Thank you for your time.

Joel Stoffer:
I enjoyed it. Thanks. It’s been a lot of fun.

Madame Kris:
Alright well, thanks so much. We can’t wait to see the rest of the season. And good luck with Stranger Things!

Joel Stoffer:
Thank you so much. Keep watching everybody.

Madame Amy:
We sure will. Thank you so much.

Madame Kris:
So that was our interview with Joel Stoffer. We can’t wait to see what the rest of the season has in store for our beloved Enoch.

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